BACK

Delta variant and vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisations

This article was published on
June 14, 2021

This explainer is more than 90 days old. Some of the information might be out of date or no longer relevant. Browse our homepage for up to date content or request information about a specific topic from our team of scientists.

A preprint, an unpublished non-peer reviewed study, from Public Health England (PHE), looks at effectiveness of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines against hospital admission with the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant.

A preprint, an unpublished non-peer reviewed study, from Public Health England (PHE), looks at effectiveness of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines against hospital admission with the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant.

Publication

Effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines against hospital admission with the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant

Not peer-reviewed
This work has not been scrutinised by independent experts, or the story does not contain research data to review (for example an opinion piece). If you are reporting on research that has yet to go through peer-review (eg. conference abstracts and preprints) be aware that the findings can change during the peer review process
Peer-reviewed
This work was reviewed and scrutinised by relevant independent experts.

What our experts say

Context and background

Resources

Media briefing

Media Release

Expert Comments: 

Dr Peter English

This is more excellent news about the vaccines and their real-world effectiveness against the Delta variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

With over 14,000 symptomatic cases, 166 of whom were hospitalised, this provides good quality evidence of real-world effectiveness.

The effectiveness is not surprising – we know that vaccines are generally increasingly effective at preventing increasingly severe illness.  Nevertheless, it is extremely reassuring to see that vaccines’ efficacy against hospitalisation with Delta variant disease is so close to their efficacy against the Alpha and original variants, and over 90% after two doses, for both vaccines.

This gives us more hope that the anticipated extension of the 21 June data for relaxing restrictions will not need to be delayed for too long, especially if further data (such as this recent paper1) show marked indirect protection.

  1. Milman O, Yelin I, Aharony N, Katz R, Herzel E, Ben-Tov A, et al. Community-level evidence for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine protection of unvaccinated individuals. Nature Medicine 2021. (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-021-01407-5).

Q&A

No items found.