BACK

Do COVID-19 vaccines improve surfactant levels in the lungs?

This article was published on
August 31, 2021

This explainer is more than 90 days old. Some of the information might be out of date or no longer relevant. Browse our homepage for up to date content or request information about a specific topic from our team of scientists.

Studies have shown that COVID-19 vaccines boost immunity, Prof. Abonyo explains whether they could also improve surfactant levels in the lungs:

Studies have shown that COVID-19 vaccines boost immunity, Prof. Abonyo explains whether they could also improve surfactant levels in the lungs:

Publication

What our experts say

Prof. Barack Abonyo

Prof. Medical Physiology and Registrar Planning, Partnerships, Research and Innovation, Kibabii University, Kenya

"No, vaccines improve the level of surfactant. Vaccines are meant to just boost your immunity by increasing the production of antibodies or prepare your body for the virus. The virus being an antigen you need an antibody to react with it to reduce its effect. So when you are given a vaccine and normally these vaccines are attenuated components of the virus,which means they are parts of the virus that cannot cause the disease but can induce or stimulate your body to produce antibodies. So the work of the vaccineis to enable you produce enough antibodies to kill the virus when you come into contact with the virus or to stop the virus from affecting you.”

Context and background

Resources

Media briefing

Media Release

Expert Comments: 

No items found.

Q&A

No items found.